On My Nightstand: Books, May 28*

Cover art, Whitehead, Underground Railroad
Goodreads photo.

Summer has clearly arrived: I finished Colson Whitehead’s book The Underground Railroad in just a few days. It’s a remarkable read, a painful and beautiful homage to America’s enslaved people. I had little knowledge of the book when I started it and was floored by the elements of magical realism it contains. I wondered how many people didn’t realize such fantastic elements (ie, rooted in fantasy) were just that, and who thought, for example, that there truly was a railroad whose actual tracks lay in tunnels under our nation. In any case, the railroad’s physical existence in the book is a stunning metaphor-made-real. I really loved this book.

Up Next
Cover art, Bohjalian, Midwives
Goodreads photo.

I’m reading Chris Bohjalian’s Midwives, a twenty-year old novel about a midwife who resorts to an emergency C-section that leaves a patient dead and puts her at the mercy of the law. The book dives right into the ways in which the ob-gyn medical establishment marginalized midwives. Such a situation is laden with sex and gender overtones. I am digging it thus far.

*As always, this post contains Amazon affiliate links. Purchase this book from them, and I get some money to put towards hosting fees. Thanks!

 

 

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On My Nightstand: Books, May 21*

Hi all! I skipped posting last week because I was still reading the same stuff. But my day job is essentially done for the summer, so now I’ll have time to read more! Yay for books!

Whitehead, Underground Railroad
Goodreads.com photo.

Last night I started Colson Whitead’s The Underground Railroad. My parents gave it to my husband last Christmas and it was buried in his to-read pile, so I stole it. I read about 45 pages last night, and my quick take at this point: Whitehead’s book thus far is a brutally honest work in which the horrors of slavery are laid out so plainly that they’d seem common, save the way the horror impacts us. That ability–to make us appreciate the quotidian nature of the brutality of slavery so as to communicate the way excruciating violence was ordinary and devastating is a gift. It’s a book that thus far is both hard to read and hard to put down.

I’ve got a small summer reading list started–anything you think I ought to get on there? I’ll dig it out and post it next week.

*This post contains an Amazon affiliate link. Purchase this book from them, and I get some money to put towards hosting fees. Thanks!

 

AMAZON AND THE AMAZON LOGO ARE TRADEMARKS OF AMAZON.COM, INC. OR ITS AFFILIATES.

We are a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.
Please follow and like us: